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Topic: Goldenhill in the late 50s & early 60s through the eyes of David Wood
Tom Simpson
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Goldenhill in the late 50s & early 60s through the eyes of David Wood
on: July 25, 2011, 18:33

These are David Wood’s recollections of village life in Goldenhill and Sandyford in the 1950s and early 1960s.

His story starts in 1946 and will continue on with more episodes of interesting facts over the coming months.

David says, I was born in 1946 and lived in Alice Street, Goldenhill until I was 19. I then moved to Sandyford where I stayed until 1974.

My earliest recollection would be starting in the nursery class around 1950.

What I intend to do is to take a stroll from the roundabout where Churchill’s is now, to the top of Kidsgrove Bank and back down again on the other side of the road to Hollywall Lane, noting as many of the businesses as I can and also including any facts I may think you might be interested in.

Starting at Sandyford where the new roundabout is now, Branson’s newsagents stood there and Salt & Riley builders was to the right of it.

Just below Shelford Road was Walton’s builder’s office where the bakery is now.

There were two football teams, Goldenhill Wanderers and Goldenhill Villa. Meakins cricket club at Shelford Road Sandyford, turned out some really good players. Did you know that Ken Higgs the England fast bowler played there and so did Pete Williams, Robbie’s dad. Every year the local pubs held a cricket knockout competition, it was very competitive.

There were two shops in Wignall Road and Mrs Mayer’s shop at the far end of Ridge Road. On the corner of Colclough Lane was a grocers shop and Plant’s butchers.

Opposite the Catholic Church was Lane’s dry cleaners before they moved to the other side of the road to a bigger shop next door to Mr Jones and it became a ladies and gents outfitters. Mrs West’s shop was on the corner of Temperance Place where the path to the Community Centre is now.

The railing and plaque which stands on the front lawn of the Community Centre used to be on the edge of the pavement opposite, outside the Church Infants school. It was donated by W Stonier and its purpose was to prevent children running out of the school yard onto the main road. I believe that it was made to commemorate the end of either the first or the Second World War, perhaps someone could have a look at it and confirm the actual inscription therein.

Look out for more of David’s stories in his next episode coming soon.


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